Irish at Pickett’s Charge. George M. Cohan. Henry Grattan on this day in Irish History

July 3: TODAY in Irish History:

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Today in Irish History: Curated by Conor Cunneen IrishmanSpeaks

Chicago Motivational Humorous Business Speaker, Author and History buff.

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For a unique perspective on Ireland featuring History and Humor, BUY Author signed copy of For the Love of Being Irish

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1746: Birth of Irish statesman and parliamentarian Henry Grattan. Grattan was member of the Patriot Movement that won legislative independence for Ireland in 1782.  He said “I found Ireland on her knees, I watched over her with a paternal solicitude; I have traced her progress from injuries to arms, and from arms to liberty. Spirit of Swift! Spirit of Molyneux! Your genius has prevailed! Ireland is now a nation! In that new character I hail her! And bowing to her august presence, I say, Esto perpetua (May it be forever)” It was not to be forever. The 1800 Act of Union abolished the Irish Parliament. On the demise of the Irish Parliament, he said to a friend, “” I sat by its cradle and followed its hearse.”

Henry Grattan (in red) addressing Irish House of Commons. Painting by Francis Wheatley

HENRY GRATTAN BIOGRAPHY at Britannica.com

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1863: At Gettysburg on day 3, “About noon a stillness reigned that was deathlike and unusual at such a time, Anthony McDermott of the 69th Pa Irish Volunteers later wrote.

“An anxious look could plainly be seen on the faces of the men, and feelings of mingled dread and determination pervaded the minds of all — a harbinger of the coming storm that was to cover the fields with so much blood… It was the presage of that storm of artillery missiles unprecedented in field battles for the number of guns and the fury of its metallic hail. At onei o’clock the stillness was broken by the discharge of one gun from the enemy’s lines ……….. “

Pickett’s Charge had begun and the 69th Pa would suffer dreadful losses. 151 of the 258 who started the day would be killed, wounded or captured. Colonel Dennis O’Kane from Coleraine was one of those mortally wounded.

Anthony McDermott 69th Pa

READ: A brief history of the 69th regiment Pennsylvania by Anthony McDermott

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1878: Legendary song and dance man George M. Cohan is born in Providence Rhode Island to Irish Catholic parents. His catalogue of songs include Give My Regards to Broadway, Yankee Doodle Boy and Over There.

George M. Cohan 1878-1942

Appropriately, Irish American Jimmy Cagney played Cohan in the 1942 movie Yankee Doodle Dandy

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Want to learn more about Ireland? See these images and more in the acclaimed For the Love of Being Irish

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For the Love of Being Irish written by Chicago based Corkman Conor Cunneen and illustrated by Mark Anderson is an A-Z of all things Irish. This is a book that contains History, Horror, Humor, Passion, Pathos and Lyrical Limericks that will have you giving thanks (or wishing you were) For the Love of Being Irish

Watch For the Love of Being Irish author Conor Cunneen – IrishmanSpeaks on his Youtube channel IrishmanSpeaks. Laugh and Learn.

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This history is written by Irish author, business keynote speaker and award winning humoristIrishmanSpeaks – Conor Cunneen. If you spot any inaccuracies or wish to make a comment, please don’t hesitate to contact us via the comment button.

Visit Conor’s YouTube channel IrishmanSpeaks to Laugh and Learn. Tags: Best Irish Gift, Creative Irish Gift, Unique Irish Gifts, Irish Books, Irish Authors, Today in Irish History TODAY IN IRISH HISTORY (published by IrishmanSpeaks)



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